​Machining Occupational Information

Operate manual or computer-controlled machines, or robots to perform one or more machine functions on metal or plastic work pieces.


​Machining:  Computer Numerical Control (CNC)

Occupation Overview

  • Run computerized machines programmed to cut and shape parts
  • Read and interpret blueprints
  • Work alone most of the time
  • Sometimes wear protective gear such as safety glasses and face masks
  • May work on a rotating schedule
  • Formal training is usually through an apprenticeship program or on the job

​​CNC Machinist

CNC Wages and Trends

Average Annual Job Openings Due To​ ​ ​Entry WageMedian Wage
​GrowthReplacement​TotalHourly​Hourly
​51-4041​Machinists​13459​​472​$12.74​$18.82
​51-4011​Computer Controlled Machine Tool Operators​113​149​262​$12.09​$17.30
​51-4012​Numerical Tool/Process Control Programmers​4​19​23​$13.95​$18.93

Note:  Occupational wage information provided in this table is a statewide average for Illinois.  Wages may vary across regions within Illinois.

​Required Knowledge and Skills (CNC)

  • Demonstrate knowledge of basic OSHA requirements, general shop safety, and machine tool safety procedures.
  • Interpret basic part prints and/or technical drawings including Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) and apply the information as it relates to gauging, dimensioning, and tolerancing.
  • Apply a working knowledge of basic measuring and inspection tools and use appropriate measuring devises to confirm a part’s compliance to required specifications including GD&T symbols.
  • Perform conversion, computations, and calculations that result in parts production to specific industry standards and specifications.
  • Demonstrate entry-level skills to setup and operate machine tools.
  • Interpret CNC G&M code programs and apply editing procedures as needed.
  • Use basic communication skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) to understand technical manuals and written work instructions while interacting well in a team/group environment.
  • Demonstrate use of basic math skills to facilitate technical metal cutting competences.
  • Sit for the relevant National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) credentialing exams.

 

​Machining:  CNC Videos

Machining:  General Production Video

​Machining:  General Production

Occupation Overview

  • Work with their hands to install, test, and fix manufacturing equipment
  • Work with technologists and engineers
  • Stand for long periods of time
  • Have a one-year certificate or a two-year degree
  • Ensure quality and safety

General Production

Wages and Trends

Average Annual Job Openings Due To​ ​ ​Entry WageMedian Wage
​GrowthReplacement​TotalHourly​Hourly
​51-2092​Team Assemblers​146​1,237​1,383​$9.20​$12.65
​51-2099​Assemblers & Fabricators, All Other​48​204​252​$9.62​$12.25
​51-4021​Extruding/Drawing Machine Setters/ Operators​105666​$10.10​$15.34
​51-4022​Forging Machine Setters/Operators/  Tenders​124​25​​$14.29​$17.96
​51-4023​Rolling Machine Setters/Operators/   Tenders​0​41​41​$13.57​$17.60
​51-4031​Cutting/Punching Machine Setters/ Operators​0​92​92​$10.02​$14.00

 Note:  Occupational wage information provided in this table is a statewide average for Illinois.  Wages may vary across regions within Illinois.

​Required Knowledge and Skills (General Production)

  • Utilize effective, safety-enhancing workplace practices in multiple industries.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of quality practices and measurement.
  • Identify basic fundamentals of blueprint reading.
  • Determine resources and workflow required of the production process.
  • Document product and process compliance with customer requirements.
  • Recognize potential maintenance problems, issues, or concerns with basic production systems.
  • Recognize preventative maintenance indicators to ensure correct operations.
  • Identify different types of basic production and related mechanical principles, mechanical linkages, and production materials.  
  • Demonstrate use of basic math skills to facilitate technical competencies.
  • Sit for the national Certified Production Technician (MSSC-CPT) exam.

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